Saturday, 12 April 2014

Here's a rare sight... a HLNE blog post!

This blog post serves two purposes. First, as a reminder that the call for papers deadline for our next event (on 'Narratives' at Durham University on 8 May) is tomorrow. What better way to spend a Sunday than writing a short abstract? Second, we thought it might be an idea to use the blog to start thinking about the theme of 'Narratives' in historical research before the event itself.

A long standing friend of History Lab (Northumbria University's Peter O'Connor) recently drew my attention to this Guardian article about truth in historical fiction. This is a somewhat different issue to that experienced by us researchers as though we may deal with narratives in various ways we're unlikely to pursue a particular narrative in our own research at the expense of academic integrity. That said, when discussing 'truth' in historical narratives the references to the ambiguity of 'historical fact' are of pertinence to us all.

As researchers dealing with various historical contexts - about which 'the facts' may be unclear - the appeal of a narrative to help us comprehend the events and processes we engage with is clear. However certain facts are often at odds with the broad narratives that historians have long used to situate and make sense of historical developments. In every whiggish account of teleological progress there are reactionary or conservative moments; Marxists conceptions are often complicated by actions that counteract economic processes; and, in my own research, the Saidian narrative of East versus West is undermined by the huge variables within these overly simplistic categories. Sometimes the nuance or complexity of historical events means that the facts don't lend themselves to a coherent narrative.

So how do historians reconcile the 'facts' (if they do indeed exist) with broader historical narratives? Come to our Durham event to find out!

Stan Neal 
(History Lab North East, Northumbria Rep)

Wednesday, 19 March 2014

Call For Papers

Following successful events from History Lab North East at Northumbria, Teesside and Newcastle University, History Lab North East is pleased to announce the call for papers for our upcoming workshop at Durham University on 8 May 2014. We are seeking papers from postgraduate students based in History, Classics, and Archaeology on the theme of ‘Narratives’. Papers should provide a brief outline of research before discussing their particular approach to the technical and theoretical aspects of constructing and dealing with existing historical narratives. Themes for these papers could include, but are not limited to:

• Narratives developed and deployed by historical actors
• Historiography and the narratives of historians
• ‘Popular’, ‘public’ and ‘dominant’ historical narratives
• Narrative patterns, tropes and recurring narratives
• Narrative types and their particular constructs of history, e.g. biographical, hagiographical, origin myths, parables and moralities
• Influence of religious and mythological narratives
• Narrating the past in historical fiction and film
• How does the narrative help or hinder the writing of your thesis?
• Is it possible to have history without a narrative?
• Who has the power to construct the past?

Each paper should be 15-20 minutes long, with an expected 10 minutes for post-paper discussion. Please send your abstracts of 200-300 words to historylab.northeast@gmail.com by 13 April 2014.

This workshop will also incorporate a training event on the same theme which will be announced with the finalised programme, and a social event after the workshop.History Lab North East aims to bring together postgraduates in the North East, offering them a chance to present their research in a friendly environment, gain insightful feedback on this research, and to network and socialise with their peers.

For more information on History Lab North East please check us out on ...
Twitter: https://twitter.com/HistoryLabNE
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryLabNorthEast

Wednesday, 5 March 2014

Discovery, Invention and Reinvention

The deadline for the Newcastle University Postgraduate Conference is the 30th March. See below for details:

Call for Papers:
11th Annual PGF Conference 2014
School of History, Classics and Archaeology
Newcastle University
16 May 2014

Discovery, Invention and Reinvention

This interdisciplinary one-day conference seeks to reflect on the continuous (re)discovery and (re)invention processes which historical disciplines and our understanding of the past go through over time.
     Through the course of history individuals, countries and cultures have discovered and rediscovered their pasts; inventing and reinventing personalities, identities, social structures, conventions and ideologies. An iconic figure or artefact may be discovered, forgotten and rediscovered by the same or different peoples and cultures, bearing different meanings and connotations for each given context. An identity or concept may be invented and reinvented at different times. This conference intends to explore these processes and man’s connection and continuous engagement with the past.
     Our keynote speaker this year is Professor Brian McGing, of Trinity College Dublin. Professor McGing holds the Regius Chair of Greek at Dublin and is a member of the Royal Irish Academy. He will be giving a paper entitled 'The attractions of roads less travelled. Reinventing Polybius, Josephus and Appian'.

We are seeking proposals for individual twenty-minute papers from historians, archaeologists, classicists and ancient historians. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

• Intellectual history and reception
• Material culture
• Family and gender
• Religion and ritual
• Comparative history
• Politics and national identity
• Class and race
• Memory and commemoration
• Historiography
• Interdisciplinary history

We also invite poster submissions from postgraduate students. The posters do not necessarily need to be on the conference theme, but rather are a way to begin to present your work in the earlier stages of your research.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250-300 words for papers and 150-200 words for posters along with title and CV to Emma Nicholson (e.nicholson@ncl.ac.uk) by 30 March 2014.

Friday, 8 November 2013

Workshop on ‘Sources and Evidence’

Seminar Room 2.20, Research Beehive, Old Library Building, Newcastle University, Friday 29th November

12.30 Introduction and welcome

12.45-13.15 Emma Nicholson (Newcastle University): ‘Bias in Polybius’ Histories and the Nature of Ancient Greek Historiography’.

13.15-13.45 Ali Chapman (Newcastle University): ‘Assessing the Bellum Hispaniense: Complications, difficulties, and language’.

13.45-14.00 Coffee break

14.00-14.30 Katherine Krick (Durham University): ‘From the Middle Ages to the Digital Age: Finding and Using Sources’.

14.30-15.00 Michael Robinson (Institute of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool):  ‘Forgotten Men; Forgotten Sources: A discussion of utilising asylum reports researching the post-war psychiatric care of Irish veterans of the Great War’.

15.00-15.15 Coffee break

15.15-15.45 Fiona Howarth (Newcastle University): ‘The Value of Correspondence as a Historical Source: A Case Study on “The California Oath Controversy”’.

15.45-16.45 Training Session Lucy Keating (Liason Librarian, Newcastle University):  ‘Using social media for history research: trivia or treasure trove?’

16:45-17.30 Discussion, ideas for the next event, and close.

For more information on History Lab North East please see our blog: http://historylabne.blogspot.co.uk/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HistoryLabNE or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryLabNorthEast

Tuesday, 1 October 2013

Call for Papers

Following successful events in the last academic year at Northumbria and Teesside University, History Lab North East is pleased to announce the call for papers for our upcoming workshop to be held at Newcastle University on November 29th 2013. We are seeking papers from postgraduate students based in History, Classics, and Archaeology on the theme of ‘Sources and Evidence’. Papers should provide a brief outline of research before discussing their particular approach to sources. Themes for these papers could include, but are not limited to:

  • Difficulties with source material and how these complications can be overcome (e.g. copyright, language, accessibility, and readability issues).
  • Dealing with multi-lingual source material.
  • The use of material culture.
  • Accessing sources.
  • Using controversial sources and what implications this may have for your research. (e.g. sources including sensitive material, human remains, sources from the recent past).
  • Combining evidence from different mediums and the positives and negatives of such an approach (e.g. oral history, correspondence, film).
  • Interdisciplinary sources (e.g. the use of anthropology, combining archaeological and historical evidence).
  • Using sources in a digital age.
  • The use of sources in public engagement.

Each paper should be 15-20 minutes long, with an expected ten minutes for post-paper discussion. Please send your abstracts of 200-300 words to historylab.northeast@gmail.com by 21 October 2013.

This workshop will also incorporate a training event on the same theme which will be announced with the finalised programme, and a social event after the workshop.

History Lab North East aims to bring together postgraduates in the North East, offering them a chance to present their research in a friendly environment, gain insightful feedback on this research, and to network and socialise with their peers. 

For more information on History Lab North East please check us out on ...
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryLabNorthEast  

Thursday, 14 March 2013

Next Workshop announced: INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES IN THE STUDY OF HISTORY (10 May 2013, Teesside Uni)



We are pleased to invite speakers for the second History Lab North East Workshop which is to be held at Teesside University on Friday 10 May. Participants are asked to submit an abstract which will form the basis of a 10-15 minute paper on the use of interdisciplinary approaches within the study of history.

As with the first workshop, papers should give a brief outline of their work and the use of interdisciplinary approaches within their research. Subjects could include but are not limited to the use of oral testimony, social science methodologies, sociological approaches to history and literature as a historical source. The emphasis in the discussion will be on these approaches, their usefulness (or lack of) within the context of historical research, and how the study of history can be part of a wider research community.

Those interested in giving a presentation please send a 100-200 word abstract via email to historylab.northeast@gmail.com with ‘Interdisciplinary Approaches’ as the subject by 19 April 2013.

Follow the History Lab on social media for further updates:
Twitter: @HistoryLabNE

Monday, 28 January 2013

Invitation to Workshop: 'The Relevance of History' (15 February, Northumbria University)


We’d like to invite all postgraduate history students in the North East to the first event of the revived North East History Lab. The event will be an informal afternoon workshop held at Northumbria University (Lipman Building, room 121) on the 15th of February all about the ‘relevance’ of History, with the aim of creating a network of postgraduate students in the North East for debate, discussion and collaboration. The planned schedule is available below. In the interests of stimulating discussion we will be posting regularly on our blog, twitter and facebook in the build-up to the event and we encourage everyone to get in touch and let us know what they think about the ‘relevance’ of history!
We would kindly ask all interested in participating to send us a short email to historylab.northeast@gmail.com to enable us to plan ahead.
 
Schedule of the event
12.00h                   Registration
12.30h                   Postgraduate Research in Context: What is the Relevance of History Today?
                                Opening remarks by the organizers
Maria Cannon (Northumbria University): ‘Families in crisis: What can the sixteenth century tell us about modern family life?’
Bertie Dockerill (University of Leicester): ‘A Tale of Two Boroughs: Changing aspects of governance, belonging and identity in the Greater Nottingham and Derby area, 1945-1969’
Lewis Young (Teesside University): ‘The relevance of history: the Press – reporting the news as it happened or as it wants?’
14.15h                   Break and Refreshments
14.30h                   Postgraduate Research Training
Helen Williams (Northumbria University): ‘Making your Research Relevant - Public Engagement through Partnerships’
16.00h                   Further Events by History Lab North East
 
Followed by drinks and further networking…
 
Kind regards,
Andre, Stephen and Stan (History Lab organizers, Northumbria Uni)